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Publication

Use of a central venous line for fluids, drugs and nutrient administration in a mouse model of critical illness

Journal Contribution - Journal Article

This protocol describes a centrally catheterized mouse model of prolonged critical illness. We combine the cecal ligation and puncture method to induce sepsis with the use of a central venous line for fluids, drugs and nutrient administration to mimic the human clinical setting. Critically ill patients require intensive medical support in order to survive. While the majority of patients will recover within a few days, about a quarter of the patients need prolonged intensive care and are at high risk of dying from non-resolving multiple organ failure. Furthermore, the prolonged phase of critical illness is hallmarked by profound muscle weakness, and endocrine and metabolic changes, of which the pathogenesis is currently incompletely understood. The most widely used animal model in critical care research is the cecal ligation and puncture model to induce sepsis. This is a very reproducible model, with acute inflammatory and hemodynamic changes similar to human sepsis, which is designed to study the acute phase of critical illness. However, this model is hallmarked by a high lethality, which is different from the clinical human situation, and is not developed to study the prolonged phase of critical illness. Therefore, we adapted the technique by placing a central venous catheter in the jugular vein allowing us to administer clinically relevant supportive care, to better mimic the human clinical situation of critical illness. This mouse model requires an extensive surgical procedure and daily intensive care of the animals, but it results in a relevant model of the acute and prolonged phase of critical illness.
Journal: Journal of Visualized Experiments
Issue: 123
Volume: 123
Pages: 1 - 5
Publication year:2017